Pipe - Oval / Egg-shaped (2)
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Design drawings and illustrations of egg-shaped sewers (continued)

Oval sewer design similar to those used in London (storm sewer for Franklin Street, Tucson, Arizona, 1915).

Source: Alfred D. Micotti, Proposed additions and extensions to the sewer system of the city of Tucson, Arizona, M.S. Thesis, University of Arizona, 1915. University of Arizona Library Special Collections Call no. E 9791 1915 1.

Oval sewer design similar to those used in London (storm sewer for Alameda Street, Tucson, Arizona, 1915.

Source: Alfred D. Micotti, Proposed additions and extensions to the sewer system of the city of Tucson, Arizona, M.S. Thesis, University of Arizona, 1915. University of Arizona Library Special Collections Call no. E 9791 1915 1.

Pipe cross-sections/designs, Eastern Europe. Date unknown.

Source: Richard Beck, recieved from the private collection of Dr. Wolfgang Wagner, University of Berlin, Germany.

Photographs
Baron Georges Haussmann and his chief engineer Eugene Belgrand started a dramatic transformation of the Paris sewers, initiated in the early 1850s as part of the comprehensive reconstruction of the city’s infrastructure during the Second Empire of Napoleon III. This oval-shaped sewer is called Place de la Resistance.

Source: Ed Curley, Pima County Wastewater Management Department, Tucson, Arizona.

Old sewer and the Metropolitan railway line. Rue Saint-Antoine trunk sewer, Paris, France, 1914.

Source: Postcard from Les Egouts de Paris.

The last brick egg-shaped sewer constructed in Bristol, England, 1961.

Source: Julian Britton, Senior Engineer, Wessex Water, Kingston Seymour Village, North Somerset, England.

Placing rat poison in oval sewer in Paris, France. Date unknown.

Source: Bruno de Ville d'Avray, Mairie de Paris / Direction de la protection de l'environnement, Section de l'assainissement de Paris; and Lucien Finel, previous Deputy to the Mayor of Paris (in charge of water and sanitation management).

Sewer system in the Kanda area of Tokyo, photo circa 2000. The first modern sewerage system in Japan was the Kanda Sewerage, which was built in 1884 in the Kanda area of Tokyo. The construction of sewerage systems did not start in earnest until the end of World War II.

Source: Making Great Breakthroughs - All about the Sewage Works in Japan (Japan Sewage Works Association: Tokyo, ca. 2002), p. 46.

An egg-shaped sewer laid alongside the subway construction in Seventh Avenue, Manhattan borough, New York City, of monolithic concrete. Circa 1916.

Source: J. F. Springer, "Methods of Concrete Sewer Construction," Municipal Engineering, Volume LI, No. 2 (August 1916), p. 50.

24" x 36" Standard English Egg-shaped sewer section from the Parmley System, a comprehensive system of reinforced concrete constructions (monolithic, segmental, and unit pipes). The first patent for the system was issued in 1902. This catalog features segmental pipe construction, which Parmley believed was one of the most efficient methods by which sewers and pipe lines could be built.

Source: Walter C. Parmley, The Parmley System of Arch Construction: Catalogue E, Segmental Concrete, Plain and Reinforced (New York, NY: Walter C. Parmley, 1927), p. 40.

56" x 84" Standard Egg-shaped sewer from the Parmley System (see above).

Source: Walter C. Parmley, The Parmley System of Arch Construction: Catalogue E, Segmental Concrete, Plain and Reinforced (New York, NY: Walter C. Parmley, 1927), p. 41.

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