Maintenance - Sewer maintenance vehicles (2)
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Horse-drawn wagon to transport water to homes, businesses, etc., before piped transmission lines were installed. Also used to haul water to flush (clean) the sewer mains. Circa 1900.
Caption reads "Mr. William Schultze will supply you with fresh water daily."

Source: Wisconsin Historical Society, photo number 31423. All rights reserved.

Standard motor truck equipped for cleaning sewer catch basins, Pawtucket, R.I., circa 1918.

Source: George A. Carpenter, "Design and Cleaning of Sewer Catch Basins," Municipal Engineering, Volume LIV, No. 4 (April 1918), p. 148.

Early sewer maintenance activities in Iowa, 1920s. The man standing in photo is Ole Bredeson, the great-grandfather of Mark S. Holstad.

Source: Mark S. Holstad, P.E., URS Corp., Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Early self-powered sewer cleaning machine, 1920s.

Source: National Clay Pipe Institute.

Advertisement for the Seco Portable Pumping Apparatus for cleaning sewer catch basins. Manufactured by The Springfield Engineering Company, Springfield, Ohio, circa 1920.

Source: The American City, October 1920, p. 82 (reverse side is text page 435).

Early motor truck for cleaning sewers, Pawtucket, Rhode Island.

Source: National Clay Pipe Institute.

Early sewer maintenance - man checking manhole using horse-drawn wagon for transportation and hauling of tools. 1930s.

Source: unknown.

Sewage department employees cleaning a sewer in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, in 1934. Notice the connection to a potable water source while, at the same time, the sewer is pressure cleaned using water from that source - definitely against today's health standards.

Source: Wisconsin Historical Society, photo number 52433. All rights reserved.

Sewer cleaning equipment in Santa Fe Springs, California, and Beaumont, Texas, 1938.

Source: Mike Baker, Balar Equipment Corporation, Phoenix, Arizona.

Early vector (mosquito) control - squirting fuel oil into a catch basin.

Source: Wisconsin Historical Society, photo number 1345. All rights reserved.

Early self-powered (by engine) sewer maintenance equipment.

Source: Mike Baker, Balar Equipment Corporation, Phoenix, Arizona.

Early self-powered (by engine) sewer rodder, trailer-mounted. 1940s - 50s.

Source: Mike Baker, Balar Equipment Corporation, Phoenix, Arizona.

OK Champion Corporation rodder truck, circa 1969. OK Champion is a company that evolved from the early endeavors of entrepeneurs in Hammond, Indiana, to fabricate sewer cleaning devices circa 1915. The company was originally called the Champion Potato Machinery Company and later changed its name to OK Champion.

Source: Water Pollution Control Federation Journal, March 1969.

U.S. Patents

Patent for settling tank, 1916. Patented by G. W. Otterson on January 4, 1916. U.S. Patent No. 1,166,713. Sheet 1. See full text description. (Use back button to return to graphics section.)

Source: United States Patent and Trademark Office at http://www.uspto.gov. Thanks to Tom Bates for finding and contributing this patent.

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