Sewers in our culture (2)
(Click on thumbnails to enlarge image)

Previous


Return to photo index

Next

For
Reference

There is a story that the Bank of England once had a sewer directly under its bullion vault. A sewer worker discovered an opening into the vault, but stole nothing -- and was rewarded for his honesty. A film called "The Day They Robbed the Bank of England" was loosely based on the existence of the sewer entrance.

Accessed at http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/ education/ museum/ walkthrough/ stories3.htm, 9-10-2007. If site is offline, see here.

Movies featuring sewers

Vienna's sewers are seen in the classic 1949 movie "The Third Man," which starred Orson Welles in the role of Harry Lime. A scene in the movie shows Lime climbing into a manhole to escape through the Vienna sewers. (See bottom photo from www.thirdmantour.at. Additional photos and movie posters can be seen at the MTPV Image Vault and the IMDB website.)

These photos show one of Vienna's unusual manholes, which lead from street level down to the vaulted sewers -- utilizing special segmented covers and spiral stairs.

These spiral stairs were similar to ones used in Paris, France, to get from street level down to the sewers for tours on the weekends, starting in the late 1800's. A tour of Vienna's sewers, titled "The Third Man Tour," can be arranged by contacting www.thirdmantour.at .

Source: Karin Hoefler, Dritte Mann Museum, Vienna, Austria. Brought to our attention by Bobbi Mastrangelo.

 

Miscellaneous

For
Reference

Bathroom artThe Art Museum Toilet Museum of Art

Catalog cover artwork for the Red Wing Stoneware Co. and John H. Rich Sewer Pipe Works of Red Wing, Minnesota, 1894.

Source: Facsimile reproduction of 1894 catalog prepared by the Goodhue County Historical Society and the Red Wing Stoneware Company, 1995. All rights reserved. Used with permission of the Goodhue County Historical Society, Red Wing Pottery Sales, Inc. and Red Wing Stoneware Company.

Sewer bill from Brooklyn, NY, for $3.55. Dated 1876.

Source: Collection of Jon C. Schladweiler, Historian, Arizona Water & Pollution Contol Association.

Arrears tax (?) bill from Brooklyn, NY, for $2.04. Dated 1876.

Source: Collection of Jon C. Schladweiler, Historian, Arizona Water & Pollution Contol Association.

Sewer bill from the Leadville Sewer Company of Leadville, Colorado, for $12.50. Dated 1898.

Source: Original owned by Jon C. Schladweiler, Historian, Arizona Water & Pollution Contol Association.

Original postcard from the Ontario Sewer Pipe Company, circa 1899.

Source: Collection of Jon C. Schladweiler, Historian, Arizona Water & Pollution Contol Association.

Original postcard, copyright 1910 by J. J. Marks, NY.

Source: Collection of Jon C. Schladweiler, Historian, Arizona Water & Pollution Contol Association.

Banquet Hall in the Dry Run Sewer, Waterloo, Iowa. In 1904, Waterloo, tired of cleaning up after floods, decided to enclose Dry Run Creek in a large storm sewer. To celebrate its completion, the Iowa League of Municipalities then held its annual banquet within the sewer. Guests entered at points between Randolph and Wellington and found a sumptuous feast laid for 400.

Source: Original postcard circa 1915. Collection of Jon C. Schladweiler, Historian, Arizona Water & Pollution Contol Association.

Ad for Walter Macfarlane & Co., circa 1912.

Source: Henry Lemmoin-Cannon, Sewage Disposal in the United Kingdom (London: St. Bride's Press, Limited, 1912). Digitized by Google Books, thanks to Tom Bates for locating and contributing this book.

1921 NY City agents pouring liquor down into a sewer during Prohibition times.

Source: Jon C. Schladweiler, Historian, Arizona Water Association (formerly AWPCA).

Calendar advertising Cannelton Sewer Pipe Co. of Cannelton, Indiana, 1941.

Source: Collection of Jon C. Schladweiler, Historian, Arizona Water & Pollution Control Association.

Previous


Return to photo index

Next

[ Home ] [ Time Lines ] [ Articles ] [ Photos/Graphics ] [ Display ] [ Bibliography ] [ Miscellaneous ] [ Links ] [ Search ]
 
Copyright © 2004 sewerhistory.org. All rights reserved.