Exploring Canada's Underground Infrastructure
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All images are courtesy of Michael Cook of Vanishing Point.

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Overflow and Relief Sewers - Garrison Creek Sewer (Overflow)
What is now exclusively an overflow was simply the lowest reach of the Garrison Creek Sewer when the city buried the Garrison Creek in the mid-1880s, and served in this capacity for twenty-five years until Toronto finally constructed an interceptor sewer system in 1910-1912.

See Garrison Creek Sewer (overflow) on Michael Cooks' Vanishing Point website. All photos and descriptions are courtesy of Michael Cook.
Old Garrison Sewer, near Queen Street.
Underpass beneath the rail corridor.
Old Garrison Sewer, near Queen Street.
Underpass chamber where the High Level Interceptor crosses the Garrison Creek Sewer at Stanley Park.
Beginning of the Low-Level Interceptor at the Asylum Stream Sewer.
Overflow and Relief Sewers - Parkside Drive Relief Sewer
The Parkside Drive Relief Sewer was built c. 1910-1912 to relieve the west end of Toronto's High Level interceptor (built concurrently) and the High Park, Junction and Earlscourt neighbourhoods that lie upstream in the sewershed. While active use of the stand-by (storage) tanks at the top of the sewer was discontinued in the 1970s with the construction of the Mid-Toronto Interceptor, the Relief Sewer continues to serve as the top-most overflow sewer for both the High-Level and the MTI.

See Parkside Drive Relief Sewer on Michael Cooks' Vanishing Point website. All photos are courtesy of Michael Cook.
The main, brick pipe is the Parkside Drive Relief Sewer. The concrete conduit on the right is a more modern addition, providing an overflow connection for the High Park Trunk Sewer (which previously connected to the Parkside Stand-by Tanks).
Midway down the Parkside Drive Relief Sewer.
Parkside Drive Relief Sewer.
Beginning of the Parkside Drive Relief Sewer.
Parkside Drive diversion to the Western Beaches Storage Tunnel, near The Queensway.
Overflow vault served by the Parkside Drive Relief Sewer.
Parkside Drive Stand-by Tanks (disused).
Parkside Drive Stand-by Tanks (disused).
Storm Sewers - Belt Line Sewer
The Belt Line Railway was conceived at the end of the 1880s, as a prolonged real estate boom drove speculative investment beyond the edges of the then-City of Toronto. The Belt Line sewer appears to have been constructed with the railway c. 1890-1892.

See Belt Line Sewer on Michael Cooks' Vanishing Point website. All photos and descriptions are courtesy of Michael Cook.
Access shaft in east arm of the Belt Line Sewer.
Horseshoe arch, Belt Line Sewer.
A-shaped arched passage near Yonge Street.
Beltline overflow inlet into the south storage tank at Memorial Park.
Access shaft, somewhere in the west arm of the Belt Line Sewer.
Overflow Chamber, Belt Line Sewer, looking upstream. Note the custom-made flow meter: a plastic tube enclosing metal one-way gates and a tennis ball.

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