J. F. Springer, “Methods of Concrete Sewer Construction,” Municipal Engineering, Volume LI, No. 2 (August 1916), pp. 47-52.

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“Construction of the Precast Reinforced Concrete Submerged Sewer Outfall at Lakewood, Ohio,” Municipal Engineering, Volume LIV, No. 4 (April 1918), p. 147.

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27 Oct 1927 advertisement for Concrete Sewer Pipe … in Engineering News – Record.  Location of sewer installation is South Bend, Indiana. Independent Concrete Pipe Co. of Indianapolis, IN.   Document Provided courtesy of Jon Schladweiler.

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Informational brochure published by the Portland Cement Assoc. entitled “Concrete Sewers”; dated 1918.  Document provided courtesy of Jon Schladweiler

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27 Oct 1927 advertisement for Concrete Sewer Pipe … in Engineering News – Record.  Location of sewer installation is South Bend, Indiana. Independent Concrete Pipe Co. of Indianapolis, IN.  Document Provided courtesy of Jon Schladweiler

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Advertisement from 1920’s; a mold with which one can make your own concrete pipe/conduit.  Source:  Jon C. Schladweiler

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Article entitled “A New Method Of Constructing Sanitary Sewers”, 21 Oct 1905 edition of the Scientific American @ page 322. Article clams concrete pipe is better in many ways that clay pipe for conveying sanitary sewage. Source:  Jon Schladweiler

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An article from the 5 May 1906 edition of The Engineering Record entitled “Concrete and Concrete Block Sewers in St. Joseph, Missouri”.  Different types of concrete sewers were designed and installed in St. Joseph over the years; some poured in place, others incorporating concrete blocks – to form arches.  Source:  Jon Schladweiler

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An article from the 28 April 1906 edition of The Engineering Record entitled “Reinforced Concrete Pipe Sewers in St. Joseph, Missouri”.  The sewers involved here were installed to “sewer” an area being reclaimed  from the Missouri River front – along the West bank of the River in St. Joseph.  The first task was to build a series of dikes to help keep river flows out of the area to be reclaimed.  Then the sewers were installed – as shown/described in this article.  Then the area to be reclaimed was filled in – streets and other utilities installed and, buildings constructed thereon. Source:  Jon Schladweiler

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Brief History – Concrete Pipe

Non-reinforced concrete pipe began to be used for culverts and sewers in the United States in the mid-1800’s.  The first sanitary sewer pipe, in the US, made of concrete was installed in 1842 in Mohawk, New York.  This gravity sewer was reported to still be in active service in 1984.The earliest use of concrete pipe for storm culverts (under roads and/or railroads) was near Salem, Illinois in 1854 – it was still in beneficial service 100 years later. France, in 1896, was reported to have been the first to reinforce concrete pipe with iron reinforcing cages/rebars.  The concept caught on in the US in the mid to late 1920’s. Initially, large diameter concrete pipe (non-reinforced or reinforced) was cast/cured at the involved job site; i.e., at trench side.  Later ( in the 1930’s), as motorized equipment for the loading/unloading of the heavy concrete pipe and, vehicles/trucks to transport the pipe from the factories to the jobsites became readily available, the pipe was cast at regional factories and transported (by trucks, railroads, or a combination thereof) to the involved jobsites.

30 July 1908 article in Engineering News entitled “The Harlem Creek Sewer and its Steel Centering: St. Louis, Missouri”.   An interesting story about the processes and equipment used to construct a large combined reinforced concrete sewer – via open trench and poured in place concrete. Source:  Jon Schladweiler

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